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IPv6 Upgrade
#1
Dear Valued Customer,

We would like announce that we have now upgraded our servers and have changed our network from IPv4 to IPv6.

Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6), sometimes called the "next generation" IP protocol (IPng), is designed by the IETF to replace the current version Internet Protocol, IP Version 4 ("IPv4"), which is now more than twenty years old. Most of today's network uses IPv4 and it is beginning to have problems, for example, the growing shortage of IPv4 addresses.

IPv6 fixes many shortages in IPv4, including the limited number of available IPv4 addresses. It also adds many improvements to IPv4 in areas. The key benefits of introducing IPv6 are:

• 340 undecillion IP addresses for the whole world network devices
• Plug and Play configuration with or without DHCP
• Better network bandwidth efficiency using multicast and any cast without broadcast
• Better QOS support for all types of applications
• Native information security framework for both data and control packets
• IPv6 offers a higher level of built-in security, and it has been specifically designed with mobile devices in mind.
• Enhanced mobility with fast handover, better route optimization and hierarchical mobility

Difference Between IPv4 and IPv6

IPv4

• Source and destination addresses are 32 bits (4 bytes) in length.
• IPSec support is optional.
• IPv4 header does not identify packet flow for QoS handling by routers.
• Both routers and the sending host fragment packets.
• Header includes a checksum.
• Header includes options.
• Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) uses broadcast ARP Request frames to resolve an IP address to a link layer address.
• Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) manages membership in local subnet groups.
• ICMP Router Discovery is used to determine the IPv4 address of the best default gateway, and it is optional.
• Broadcast addresses are used to send traffic to all nodes on a subnet.
• Must be configured either manually or through DHCP.
• Uses host address (A) resource records in Domain Name System (DNS) to map host names to IPv4 addresses.
• Uses pointer (PTR) resource records in the IN-ADDR.ARPA DNS domain to map IPv4 addresses to host names.
• Must support a 576-byte packet size (possibly fragmented).

IPv6

• Source and destination addresses are 128 bits (16 bytes) in length.
• IPSec support is required.
• IPv6 header contains Flow Label field, which identifies packet flow for QoS handling by router.
• Only the sending host fragments packets; routers do not.
• Header does not include a checksum.
• All optional data is moved to IPv6 extension headers.
• Multicast Neighbor Solicitation messages resolve IP addresses to link-layer addresses.
• Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) messages manage membership in local subnet groups.
• ICMPv6 Router Solicitation and Router Advertisement messages are used to determine the IP address of
• the best default gateway, and they are required.
• IPv6 uses a link-local scope all-nodes multicast address.
• Does not require manual configuration or DHCP.
• Uses host address (AAAA) resource records in DNS to map host names to IPv6 addresses.
• Uses pointer (PTR) resource records in the IP6.ARPA DNS domain to map IPv6 addresses to host names.
• Must support a 1280-byte packet size (without fragmentation).
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